Monday, April 14, 2014

jtotheizzoe:

Best Astrophotography of the Year, as chosen by the Royal Observatory Greenwich.

From both an existential and purely technical/photographic aspect, these shots blow my mind. Check out the full gallery of winners at My Modern Met.

(Top two images by Mark Gee, bottom image by Adam Block)

Bonus: Check out grand prize winner Mark Gee’s breathtaking video of a rising moon and tiny human silhouettes, pointing at it and ooh-ing and ahh-ing and generally marveling at the lunar awesomeness. It’s just … wow.

Tuesday, April 8, 2014
18mr:

When you “don’t see race…” - CM
Via The New Yorker Magazine.

18mr:

When you “don’t see race…” - CM

Via The New Yorker Magazine.

Friday, April 4, 2014
proletarianinstinct:

hopelesslywondering:

The average length of a hug between two people is 3 seconds. But researchers have discovered something fantastic. When a hug lasts 20 seconds, there is a therapeutic effect on the body and mind. The reason is that a sincere hug produces a hormone called “oxytocin”, also known as the love hormone. This substance has many benefits in our physical and mental health, helps us, among other things, to relax, to feel safe and calm our fears and anxiety. This wonderful calming is offered free of charge every time we have a person in our arms, who cradled a child, we cherish a dog or cat, we’re dancing with our partner, the closer we get to someone or just hold the shoulders of a friend.

—HUG EVERYTHING TO PRODUCE HAPPINESS, THANKS.


I AM A FIRM BELIEVER IN HUG THERAPY

proletarianinstinct:

hopelesslywondering:

The average length of a hug between two people is 3 seconds. But researchers have discovered something fantastic. When a hug lasts 20 seconds, there is a therapeutic effect on the body and mind. The reason is that a sincere hug produces a hormone called “oxytocin”, also known as the love hormone. This substance has many benefits in our physical and mental health, helps us, among other things, to relax, to feel safe and calm our fears and anxiety. This wonderful calming is offered free of charge every time we have a person in our arms, who cradled a child, we cherish a dog or cat, we’re dancing with our partner, the closer we get to someone or just hold the shoulders of a friend.



HUG EVERYTHING TO PRODUCE HAPPINESS, THANKS.

I AM A FIRM BELIEVER IN HUG THERAPY

(Source: enigmatic-being)

Saturday, March 29, 2014
brazilwonders:

(via weheartit)
Wednesday, March 12, 2014
tokomon:

when someone calls a white person “cracker”

tokomon:

when someone calls a white person “cracker”

Sunday, March 2, 2014
brazilwonders:

Caraguatatuba - São Paulo (by Wander Flash)

brazilwonders:

Caraguatatuba - São Paulo (by Wander Flash)

Friday, February 28, 2014

Something to think about: The Earth is 4.6 billion years old. Let’s scale that to 46 years. We have been here for 4 hours. Our industrial revolution began 1 minute ago. In that time, we have destroyed more than 50% of the world’s forests.
This isn’t sustainable.

Something to think about: The Earth is 4.6 billion years old. Let’s scale that to 46 years. We have been here for 4 hours. Our industrial revolution began 1 minute ago. In that time, we have destroyed more than 50% of the world’s forests.

This isn’t sustainable.

(Source: infinitylooper)

brazilwonders:

Bertioga - São Paulo (by Turismo Paulista)

brazilwonders:

Bertioga - São Paulo (by Turismo Paulista)

Thursday, February 20, 2014
herr-lucifer:

theoccultowl:

digg:

How to take the perfect nap

Where is the forever column?

they forgot the “3 hour death nap” where you wake up and feel like you’ve been run over by a tractor and your mascara has crusted your eyes shut 

herr-lucifer:

theoccultowl:

digg:

How to take the perfect nap

Where is the forever column?

they forgot the “3 hour death nap” where you wake up and feel like you’ve been run over by a tractor and your mascara has crusted your eyes shut 

Sunday, January 19, 2014 Wednesday, January 15, 2014

anarcho-queer:

artesany:

La realidad en Michoacan VOL I

(Grupos de autodefensa y policías comunitarias contra el crimen organizado e instituciones corruptas)

Mexican vigilantes set up by residents of the state of Michoacan has recently disarmed and ousted the local state police and are currently battling the The Knights Templar drug cartel.

The “self-defence groups” took control of a number of towns in an effort to drive out members of a drug cartel.

Yesterday. the Mexican Government has deployed federal police forces to disarm the ‘self-defense groups’.

The army moved into Nueva Italia, where vigilantes and members of the Knights Templar drug gang engaged in a fire fight on Sunday.

Estanislao Beltran who heads a vigilante group in the town of Tepalcatepec said two of his men had been killed amid a tense standoff with federal security forces.

Some vigilante groups have refused to lay down arms, saying they will fight “to the end

We’re here to the death, all of us,” he warned.

The vigilante groups first emerged in early 2013 as response to the violence perpetrated by the drug cartel, which ranges from extortion to kidnappings.

Local citizens said that they had no choice but to arm themselves as federal troops failed to guarantee their security.

The Knights Templar, which controls much of the methamphetamine trade to the United States, says the vigilantes have sided with their rivals of the New Generation cartel, something the “self-defence groups” fiercely deny.

Sunday, January 5, 2014

sinidentidades:

Mexico’s Zapatista rebel movement marks 20 years

In the misty mountain strongholds of the southern Mexico state of Chiapas, ski mask-clad members and supporters of the Zapatista rebel movement gathered to mark the 20th anniversary of a New Year’s uprising that wrenched the world’s attention to the plight of the country’s impoverished and oft-ignored indigenous.

The Zapatistas and hundreds of sympathizers from around the world gathered Tuesday night to remember an armed uprising that although brief — calming after 12 days of bloodshed under a government truce — was followed by an occasionally tense two-decade standoff.

Before the revolt, “We were fooled, manipulated, controlled and forgotten. We were sunk in ignorance and poverty. But 20 years ago, on these days, we said ‘enough,’” an indigenous leader known as Comandante Hortensia told the crowd at one of the celebrations, held in a schoolyard in the town of Oventic.

About 2,000 people from Mexico, the U.S., Europe and elsewhere danced, played basketball and sang political songs in the chilly night, as well as listening to Zapatista commanders speak in Spanish and the indigenous languages of Tzotzil and Tzeltal.

The Zapatista rebellion stunned Mexico and drew widespread support from leftists across the world with its message of indigenous rights and opposition to economic globalization. 

Recently, the world’s attention has drifted to other efforts in indigenous empowerment.

In Bolivia, where Evo Morales took office as the first indigenous president in 2006, Aymara and Quechua Indians now appear in the presidential Cabinet and as anchors on national news shows.

Pipe-smoking Zapatista leader Subcomandante Marcos seemed to acknowledge that many have turned their attention elsewhere.

“They left. Some went faster than others. And the majority of them don’t look at us, or they do so with the same distance and intellectual disdain that they did before the dawn of Jan. 1, 1994,” Marcos wrote in a statement released Saturday.

The movement itself has not always encouraged attention. After bursts of protest marches and nationwide tours, jungle conventions and biting, humorous communiques, it has sometimes withdrawn back into its communities for long periods of near-silence.

For some, its greatest achievement was prompting Mexico to enshrine sweeping anti-discrimination measures in its constitution in 2001. Passaged followed a Zapatista caravan across a dozen states to the capital, climaxing in dramatic speeches by masked rebels in Congress.

But the Zapatistas were enraged when lawmakers watered down sections that interested them most: expanding indigenous autonomy and control over land and natural resources.

Mexico’s indigenous remain an oft-discriminated community who often denied entry to, or service at, posh restaurants and stores. They only occasionally receive attention, as when a basketball team of Trique Indian boys, some of whom play shoeless, won a youth basketball tourney this year.

But the Zapatistas known by their initials as the EZLN are still alive and kicking, said the Roman Catholic Bishop of San Cristobal de las Casas, Felipe Arizmendi. The church has long played a role in indigenous movements in Chiapas.

“The EZLN remains alive, not as a military option, but as a social and political organization that fights for a dignified life,” Arizmendi said last week. “It is an effort to demonstrate that autonomy is possible; you don’t have to depend on the government.”

Indeed, they don’t: The Zapatistas run their own schools and health clinics, though many appear to be underfunded and ill-equipped.

The Zapatistas have been criticized in the last decade for withdrawing too much from public view. They failed to endorse leftist candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador in the 2006 presidential elections, which he lost by a margin of about half a percentage point.

Nor have the communities’ material conditions improved. Most Zapatistas still eke out meager livings as corn farmers, with occasional attempts to carve more farmland out of Chiapas’ shrinking jungles. Marcos responded to such criticisms with his usual bristliness.

“What has the EZLN done for Indian communities? We are responding with the direct testimony of tens of thousands of our members,” he wrote, saying the news media should ask themselves instead what they have done to improve pay, working conditions or readership for reporters.

Still Marcos said the act of rebellion itself is enough reason to celebrate.

“Rebellion, friends and enemies, is something that has to be celebrated, every day and at every hour. Because rebellion is also a celebration.”

Some commentators warn that Mexico today may look chillingly like it did in 1994. The Zapatista uprising occurred on the very day the North American Free Trade Agreement took effect. The deal, hotly opposed by the left, opened Mexico’s markets to U.S. goods.

This year, Mexico approved another major opening — energy reforms that will allow private and foreign firms to drill for oil in Mexico . That angered and frustrated the left.

“The atmosphere of victory that one finds today … is reminiscent of the end of 1993,” noted columnist Carlos Loret de Mola. The defeat of the left in Congress on energy reform “is opening more space for those who are betting on armed struggle,” he wrote.

Saturday, January 4, 2014
Princeton University psychologist Susan Fiske took brain scans of heterosexual men while they looked at sexualised images of women wearing bikinis. She found that the part of their brains that became activated was pre-motor - areas that usually light up when people anticipate using tools. The men were reacting to the images as if the women were objects they were going to act on. Particularly shocking was the discovery that the participants who scored highest on tests of hostile sexism were those most likely to deactivate the part of the brain that considers other people’s intentions (the medial prefrontal cortex) while looking at the pictures. These men were responding to images of the women as if they were non-human.

The Equality Illusion (via lesilencieux)

BUT SEXISM ISN’T REAL Y’ALL WE’RE JUST MAKING IT UP. THIS ISN’T LITERAL OBJECTIFICATIONNAH. (via longdivisionnnn)

Fucking hell.

(via greenpeniwrite)

Horrified but not suprised. Not in the least.

(via stfusexists)

(Source: thoughtfulcynic)

punkpedagogy:

jamietheignorantamerican:

Go Forth and Educate Yourselves!

I’d also highly recommend watching the Jane Elliot Brown-eye/Blue-eye experiments, which can be found here:

i mean this, and racism doesn’t mainly operate on an individual “i’m racist/i’m not racist” level. it’s more than just about privilege politics. it’s about power and oppression, which act through individuals but are not individual. it’s institutional and it’s structural, as hinted at up there but not followed through. yes, it is important to recognize privilege because it is part of oppression. but that’s not where it should stop.

Monday, December 30, 2013

astrorice:

How to Look at Art, Arts & Architecture, Ad Reinhardt, January 1947

OH MY GOD YES

(Source: lessadjectivesmoreverbs)